September 2, 2010

Comparing adoption in Australia and the U.S.

I watched Wo Ai Ni (I Love You) Mommy last night.  Post forthcoming after I watch it again.  Seriously, once was not enough.
It got me in a "adoption is really screwed up and things have to change" frame of mind (not only because of what I saw in the film), so I spent a little time surfing today to see what I could find.  I came across the website of Clova Publications and Evelyn Robinson.  Information about Evelyn from the site:
Evelyn Robinson is a mother who, in 1970, was separated from her first child, Stephen, through adoption. They were reunited in 1991. When Evelyn wrote her first book, Adoption and Loss – The Hidden Grief, she wanted to have full control over the content, presentation and marketing of her book. For this reason Evelyn created Clova Publications and published the book herself.

Since Adoption and Loss – The Hidden Grief was first published in 2000, Evelyn has also published a revised edition in 2003, followed by her second book Adoption and Recovery – Solving the mystery of reunion, in 2004. Evelyn then published her third book, Adoption Reunion - Ecstasy or Agony? in 2009.
Evelyn kindly posts her articles and presentations, and in the course of perusing her library, I came across two that were particularly interesting to me.  I hear a lot and you may, too, about the fact that Australian adoption practices today (not necessarily historically) are more respectful of mothers' and children's rights to stay together than are U.S. policies.  Coincidentally, Cedar posted today about an article entitled Unmarried mums get State apology.  I dare you to hold your breath in this country until that happens.

Anyhow, in the course of this surfing and finding Evelyn Robinson's site, there were two articles in particular that caught my eye.  I scanned both and will be reading them more carefully, but even the scan tells me that we have a lot to learn from our friends down under.
There's much more on the site.  Enjoy - and let me know what you think of these two articles in particular, as well as any others you may read, too.

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